Angel investor · Apps

Seeking Candid Feedback - Kickstarter Crowdfunding Campaign

Saquib Khan A real hero, don't need a mask, cape or special dress - All you need is DupDup App - Saquib Khan

May 7th, 2019

Dear community,

I have finally launched crowdfunding campaign at Kickstarter https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dupdup/best-of-the-apps-the-new-social-app-that-make-you


We have raised $101 on the first day by 3 backers! Yay! I have 5,561 followers on FB- About 1,000 on Twitter and 1,600 on Instagram - but most of them are not fans but viewers.


Do you believe Crowdfunding boost services worked or they are waste of $money & time. I know for sure - the app success rate on crowdfunding platforms is super low (<2%) unless, you have a huge network.


Let me know your feedback on Campaign https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dupdup/best-of-the-apps-the-new-social-app-that-make-you - I put it all together :-)


Thanks,

Saquib Khan

Founder - https://www.Dup-Dup.com (Live and Kicking)

& https://www.sapheroes.com (Coming soon)




Paul Garcia marketing exec & business coach

May 8th, 2019

A Kickstarter campaign most often fails because it's not really a campaign, it's an ad. If you look at KS as advertising for money, it's far less likely to succeed. The most provoking KS campaigns have pretty much been a 24/7 strategic marketing effort with a whole team working on the story, being engaging, and extremely communicative. Planning such a campaign can take months before it launches, so every detail is considered, from the vocabulary of your spokesperson to what way you demonstrate your idea to how you can walk contributors up the ladder in small steps for increased donation amounts.


Most KS campaigns I see aren't prepared that way. And you will be compared to all others in your marketspace on the platform. When you fail, you not only hurt yourself, but anyone else who might try to raise in your product area.


Not every product is a great candidate for crowdfunding. Those that move to the platform and succeed have often run small campaigns offline to develop practice in understanding what wins a reaction and is very shareable. KS might seem easy, but it's an unruly beast. To tame it you need a very high level of controlled and sustained effort. Unless you're a unicorn, it's never just Launch, then sit back and watch donations come in, even if you have an audience from before.


Why would your existing audience want to promote your fundraising effort. Besides rewards, what's in it for them to make your financial situation better?


So, I'm highly critical of the founder video you've posted. I didn't want to listen after the first 12 seconds. I did continue for about half, and then I couldn't tolerate it anymore. It was too slow, not exciting, talked about what's in it for you, did not solve a problem I have, and did not explain what makes it different or desirable. You spent a lot of time talking about what Dup-Dup is not. Don't do that. Always say what you are, what benefits you provide (not features) and give reasons why others can believe you.


The whiteboard video also spends the first quarter talking about negatives. I wanted to tune out quickly there too. I wanted to know what it DOES, not what the problems are. I know my problems and don't want someone reminding me. I don't want to know about your developers, about how it works or was built, I want to know how it helps me, and only that.


If I could re-launch your KS campaign, I would completely rewrite the message. Focus entirely on the "Be a Hero" aspect. Appeal to people's willingness to be kind. Give examples of how life was improved by a connection they made. I don't want to hear about phony health claims. I want an authentic story. The founder video needs a lot of style help. It comes off as a desperate plea and not an excited demonstration. I also don't like staring up at you from below.


Of course these are my opinions as a marketing guy. But there's nothing in the KS campaign that makes me see it as anything other than an ad to download the exiting product. I'm not in the least bit understanding what the $20K will enable. I'm not interested in the rewards being offered. And the dollar amounts for the rewards are all wrong. People who use social media spend in $1.99, $4.99, $14.99, and $24.99 amounts. What gave you the idea that you'd succeed with the lowest amount as $50?


I'm sorry, I only have criticism for this campaign as it is today. My suggestion would be to take it down now and start over with a much more refined plan.


As I have watched you post on CFL for months, I suspect that this KS campaign follows in the same way as your current marketing efforts which have not gotten you where you want to be yet. It's the strategy that needs work, not a bigger audience. Your audience will come when you have something positive, unique, and authentic to show them. Dup-Dup focuses on the negative and the call-to-action is about something that benefits you, not the user. Those are problematic and will not drive adoption.



Mr. Kelly Johnson Looking for Co-founder

May 9th, 2019

I agree with Paul.


I’ve seen you post a few times before and have tried to figure it out. I’ve watched each video and explanation you have had over the couple years. I still don’t get it. I still am not sure what it is. I can become a hero to someone? How? Why would I want to? What do I have to do? What will I get from that? What will the hero do to solve the problems you present?


The video talks about why social media is bad and is killing us. We shouldn’t spend time on social media for XYZ reasons. Sounds like your solution is more social media, just your social media. I don’t get that. But your social media is better because there isn’t bullying, It’s all positive content? Is it policed? How does it assure I don’t get the bad stuff? Who decides if it’s bad?


Sounds like it’s community based, as in you can ask the community anything. But doesn’t sound like you have a community yet. If I have a question, like today my truck broke down. I Googled the OBD code and it brought me right to multiple Ford forums with multiple discussions on exactly my code/ truck. Those forums are specialized. I don’t see that yours is. Which means there would be little chance I would have gotten the answer I was looking for, even if your forum already had millions of users. I am always weary of a site that tries to be everything to everyone.


But let’s say by chance I ask what P1233 code diagnosis is on an F150 on DupDup and someone happens to be online while I sat in the road median, that knows what it is, they answer. Do I then vote to make them my Hero? Isn’t that like just liking a post on Facebook, only the like follows the person, not the post? What if I figure out later they were wrong? Do they get demoted? Then AI monitors all this, and feeds me jokes about Fords and stuff?


Will the AI have filtered out that person from even seeing my post because they didn’t happen to have asked a question about Fords before?


Maybe that is the solution Paul talked about. Take a case study or two and follow it through in the video so we have some sort of reference.


I went to an entrepreneur event last night where people such as yourself have a booth where they explain their startup. Then everyone votes on who had the best startup concept. I came across Achvit.com and it reminded me a lot of what I thought DupDup was anyway. They have something similar to the hero system, the verbal presentation actually used that word “Hero” to describe what you can be to a person when you help encourage someone else to achieve-it. Maybe look into these guys site.


From a Kickstarter perspective. At least from the video, you are just asking for donations to throw in your general fund. That you have no objectives other than you are out of money and this is your last ditch effort. As a potential backer, I get no confidence you will succeed even if you get your goal. No plan. The video says nothing about why I should donate, what I get, what the money will be used for, etc. I look at the actual rewards, and they are basically nothing-burgers. Reinforcing my belief that you are just looking for donations.


I’ve wanted to be positive over the couple years, but I just don’t get it. I think more than money, you need to get someone on board that can relay your vision better. Maybe refine that vision is ultimately what needs to happen? And I think you are too close to the forest to see the trees for that task.

Robert Hoskins (4,400+)

May 8th, 2019

Any firm that trolls Kickstarter looking for business should only be trusted if they work by selling through affiliate links, especially if they contact you after you have reached your goal.


It is s common practice for some of these folks to work with proposed superbackers, who will back your project as long as you're paying their marketing fees. Once you stop paying them, all of their superbackers will cancel their pledges.


And, any legitimate marketing firm will build a network of real world customers not superbackers. Once your project is funded, your company will fail because superbackers are either serial crowdfunding addicts or working with a team of people with less than professional goals.


Some questions should send up red flags immediately:


1. Individuals, their company website and their social media should be extensive and have more than 5 years of stats to match their marketing claims.


2. If they claim to have raised millions of dollars, they should be a part of the crowdfunding team's member profiles. A common tactic is to join a crowdfunding project, convince the founders to pay them for a small amount of work, deliver lackluster performance and get fired for it, but then claim they raised all the money - which is a flat out lie.


3. Also ask them what state their articles of incorporation are filed and then check with that said to see if they have checkered past or any complaints filed against them.


4. Never pay any crowdfunding firm any money without verifying a phone number, a real business filing with a state, or anyone that refusing to talk to you on a phone number where you can call them back. No phone number, 30 minute or longer phone conversation and the inability to track them down should they take your money and not deliver a single cent of crowdfunding sales.


5. If they are in a foreign country and they take your money, there is absolutely nothing you can do to get your money back.


6. A better strategy is to not pay them until after their marketing campaign ends. No crowdfunding sales results = no payment.


I could keep going, but you should get the point.


If they tout their substantial databases of backers and funds raised, then they should be more than confident in working strictly on a commission basis.


If they don't trust their own social media or super backer networks and their own marketing people to convert social media, PR and other types of marketing into sales commissions for their company, then you shouldn't trust them or expect them to deliver any sales at all.


Nothing like trusting someone, believing their lies, paying them money upfront, getting excited because you are raising a lot of money only to run out of money , quit paying them and then watch the superbackers ALL cancel their pledges.


Never trust anyone who trolls for business on Kickstarter, Indiegogo or any other crowdfunding site by pouncing on unsuspecting entrepreneurs who have a hard time not taking the bait because they will do anything to raise money, especially when crowdfunding sales have stalled.

Saquib Khan A real hero, don't need a mask, cape or special dress - All you need is DupDup App - Saquib Khan

May 8th, 2019

Thanks, Bob for the sage advice.


@Lisa - Yes - but there`s long way to go!

Saquib Khan A real hero, don't need a mask, cape or special dress - All you need is DupDup App - Saquib Khan

May 10th, 2019

Good morning,

Thanks, Kelly - I have a proposal for anyone here can contact me contact@dup-dup.com with their profile - if anyone would help me to refine my Campaign,story and video. I am ready to share equity, and will offer 5% of KS goal - only if we meet the target.


Thanks,

Saquib Khan

contact@dup-dup.com

Louis Lim Founder, CEO Helios Eos

May 16th, 2019

Honest Opinion. Don't even waste time on Kickstarter, too much work too little results. The hype is over.



Saquib Khan A real hero, don't need a mask, cape or special dress - All you need is DupDup App - Saquib Khan

May 9th, 2019

Thanks Paul for invaluable insight. It`s clear I want help from somebody like you to hone the marketing plan. The harsh reality - we cant move an inch without $funds, so I am trying! Let`s see...


Thanks,

Saquib Khan

Saquib Khan A real hero, don't need a mask, cape or special dress - All you need is DupDup App - Saquib Khan

May 16th, 2019

Good morning,

The project is 2% funded - 4 bakers - 35 Days to go!


My proposal is still on the table - contact me contact@dup-dup.com with your profile - if anyone would help me to refine my Campaign,story and video. I am ready to share equity, as well as offer 5% of KS goal - only if we meet the target.


Thanks,

SK

Lisa Cutter Marketing Maven

May 7th, 2019

Hi,


To be clear, dup dup is a competitor to Instagram? Is that right?


Lisa